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What’s the Right Way to Structure a Marketing Service Agreement?

Real estate practitioners entering into marketing service agreements with lenders, title companies, and other settlement service providers is a well-established practice, but a recent court decision shows why you have to structure these agreements the right way.

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An appellate court just ruled that it’s okay for a mortgage lender to refer business to mortgage insurers who are buying reinsurance from an affiliate of the lender, because the reinsurance is a bona fide service and the insurers are paying fair market rates for it. In other words, the arrangement doesn’t amount to a kickback.

Although the case involves a lender, insurance companies, and a reinsurer, the structure of the agreement is something that applies to the kind of marketing service agreements you might be involved in as an agent or broker. Any agreement you enter into with a lender or title company must be for actual services rendered and priced at fair market rates and not simply an arrangement for referrals.

How do you ensure a marketing agreement is appropriate under federal anti-kickback rules? The most important thing is to have it looked at by an attorney who’s familiar with the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, or RESPA. For a general idea, though, there are two tests you can apply:

1.Is the marketing fee you receive based on the number of referrals you make to the company, whether it’s a title company, a lender, or another service provider? If the fee corresponds to the number of referrals, you could be inviting a close look by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which is the federal agency that enforces RESPA.

2. If you have an arrangement to split costs on a joint project, like a newspaper ad, is the split reflective of what each of you get in return? For example, if you and the title company are splitting the cost of the ad down the middle, then half the ad should go to the title company and half should go to you. If the title company is covering 75 percent of the cost of the ad but only taking up 25 percent of the space, that split makes it look like the company is subsidizing 50 percent of the ad cost. Again, you could be inviting a close look by the CFPB.

Learn more about the recent court decision in the latest Voice for Real Estate news video from NAR. The video also looks at what was in the budget agreement enacted into law about two weeks ago. Among other things, the new law extends the tax deduction for mortgage insurance premiums and retains the prohibition on taxing forgiven mortgage debt as income. It also looks at why a recent Supreme Court decision on the regulation of bodies of water is important to your inbdustry.

Watch video now.

Robots are Starting to Do Showings

vre 80 stillA company called Zenplace in San Francisco is using robots to help its agents conduct showings. When people arrive at the unit, they’re greeted by what amounts to an iPad on a mobile stand that leads them around, but it’s personalized; it’s the agent’s image and voice that people see and hear. Other companies are coming out with their own versions of this.

It’s a good question whether this type of automation will take off. As people get used to buying goods at automated stores in which everything is done with your phone or credit card and no employees are around, it’s feasible mobile iPads will do the trick at showings.

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Screen grab from Zenplace video

Whether you like the idea or not, it’s a trend that’s poised to hit your industry. There are other tech trends you’ll be faced with whether you like them or not. One is a kind of virtual tour that’s more immersive than what you get by just wearing goggles. You get an additional tactile component, because you’re wearing gloves with sensors. Now you feel the door handle when you open the refrigerator as well as see it in multiple dimensions.

Will this be the norm six years from now? Who knows, but now that the genie’s out of the bottle, it’s not likely to get put back in.

REALTOR® Magazine spent a few days at CES in Las Vegas two weeks ago and brought back coverage of all types of tech innovations coming to real estate. CES stands for Consumer Electronics Show and it’s the big showcase each year at which companies try to wow people with what the’re cooking up for us.

You can learn more about CES and also about real estate robots in the latest Voice for Real Estate video. The video also looks at something the U.S. Department of Labor did a few weeks ago that could eventually be important to you because it promises to get the real estate industry one step closer to setting up association health plans (AHPs) for independent contractors.

The agency proposed adding “working owner” to the definition of employer for purposes of setting up AHPs, which would enable sole proprietors and small business owners to ban together for insurance under the large group market, which could make coverage available more cheaply than under the small group market. There remain a lot of hurdles, but this was a crucial step in the right direction.

The video also looks at the three-day federal government shutdown and what could happen to your pipeline of homes sales if there’s another one in a few weeks, which could happen since the short-term budget law expires in early February. If your buyers are applying for FHA-backed financing, they would probably be okay, although processing might take a bit longer. But if they[re buying a new house in a flood area, they might not be able to get flood insurance, and that would mean a delay in  closing.

Watch the video now.

Do Personality Assessments Work? Sometimes.

@maialisa, 2016. pixabay.com

@maialisa, 2016. pixabay.com

I’ve always been skeptical of personality assessments. After taking the DISC twice—once getting a D/C and more recently getting a high, nearly even I/D—I found that both results matched my personality on some levels and conflicted on others. This is where my skepticism come in. There’s truth in assessments to varying degrees.

Whether or not you’re looking into assessments for personal insight or to use as a tool for hiring, it’s important to find the right one for you. Recently, I wrote a piece for REALTOR® Magazine on EQ vs. IQ, which examines the concept of emotional intelligence and how it relates to working with clients. I interviewed experts in the field who offered actionable tips for getting in touch with your EQ and applying it to your job in real estate. The article is divided into three parts, and in the last section—which is targeted at broker-owners or hiring managers—I dive into how to recruit high-EQ candidates.

As part of my research, I took Keller Williams Realty’s Keller Personality Assessment (KPA), which I found to be the most accurate and enlightening assessment I’ve experienced to date. It encapsulated so many idiosyncrasies of my personality that it was astonishing. But I shouldn’t be surprised since their business model is all about building teams that work well together. What better way to get a window into a person’s true self than by asking them to take an assessment to learn how they’ll fit in with your group? The key word in that question is “window.”

Whether you’re using DISC, a brokerage tool like KW’s KPA, or another test, such as the Caliper Profile, look at it as one piece of the puzzle (e.g. don’t put all your eggs in one basket). You still need to make sure you’re recruiting the right person or making a good hire. Here are some takeaways after taking the KPA:

Know what you’re assessing. Hiring someone just because you like them or you “click” isn’t always a good idea. Really consider the skillset the job requires before administering the assessment. Know what you’re looking for and have a checklist. Make sure you’re judging candidates not only on their strengths but how those strengths might serve as either pros or cons in a specific position.

@Clker-Free-Vector-Images, 2014. pixabay.com

@Clker-Free-Vector-Images, 2014. pixabay.com

Understand that an assessment might not tell the whole story. Some candidates can overthink their responses when taking an assessment, which may affect accuracy. That’s why it’s imperative to ask follow-up questions pertaining to the results of any tests you administer. Ask the candidate how they feel about the results and how accurate they think they are. Ask for examples pertaining to candidates’ assessed strengths as they’ve played out in real-life or on-the-job.

Don’t put people in a box. I hate using that box cliché, but it’s true. Many assessments cement a person as one way or another, failing to consider how one trait might inform other characteristics. For instance, my high responsiveness, spontaneity, and logical problem-solving skills, coupled with my desire for independence, means I work best in environments that are busy, active, and give me a range of responsibilities to manage. But looking at each of those traits independently, you might not draw that conclusion.

In-person interviews are best. It’s much easier to read someone’s comfort level when you see their body language. You can also give them insight into your company culture. And according to Karina Loken, president of The Loken Group with Keller Williams Luxury International in Houston, if a candidate feels your office is a good fit for them, it’s always good for your organization.

 Read More: Is EQ More Powerful Than IQ?

A Closer Look at CES’s Game Changers

ces-logoAt CES 2018, the consumer electronics’ mega show in Las Vegas this week, I hung out with robots, tried out the latest VR headsets, and talked—yes, talked—to a host of appliances, from a bathroom mirror to a refrigerator. After scouring the show floor, I found several products this year that hold real potential to shake up the real estate market. In the video below, I outlined what I think is some of the best tech I saw at the show this year. But of course, my rankings are subjective so use the poll below to vote for your favorite!

Check out all of REALTOR® Mag’s CES 2018 coverage.

 

Which of these 10 game changers from CES 2018 has the most potential to impact your business?

Get Smarter About Smart Homes

ces-logoConsumers are increasingly curious about smart home technology, and they’re turning to real estate agents as a vital resource for information. Forty-two percent of consumers recently surveyed say they would look to their real estate agent to provide suggestions about how staging their home with smart-home products could impact their sale, according to a new survey conducted by Coldwell Banker. The company presented their findings at the consumer electronics’ mega event, CES 2018, which is taking place in Las Vegas this week. Coldwell Banker is a sponsor of the Smart Home Marketplace at this year’s show.

“Our consumer findings underscore the need for industrywide smart-home education for real estate sales agents,” says Charlie Young, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Real Estate.

Our interview with David Marine, senior vice president of marketing at Coldwell Banker, delves further into what real estate professionals can expect from buyers and sellers over the next few years:

CES2018: Smart Homes, Robots, and More

The technology industry’s mega event, known as CES, kicks off in Las Vegas this week, and thousands of companies are gearing up to show off their latest innovations. And this year’s trade show promises plenty for the real estate industry as well.
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This will be my third run covering CES from Las Vegas, and it’s one of the few conferences that brings the city to a practical standstill. More than 3,900 companies are showing off products throughout the city’s hotels and convention center. I’ll admit it can be overwhelming; people zoom by on Hoverboards, drones swarm overhead, televisions loom larger than your eyes can take in, booming speakers rattle you to the core, cars drive by on their own, and random robots rush up to greet you. Thankfully, when you need to escape from all the flashiness, you can slip on a VR headset and become immersed in the sight and sounds of the beaches of Tahiti. While the CES show floor is a wild sight, it does offer one of the best glimpses into the technology that could rock the real estate world in the next few years. And I’m here to find the tools that may transform the way you conduct showings, advance how you market properties, and make your mobile office even more efficient.

In preparation, hundreds of PR folks have flooded my voicemail and email inboxes, all with promises that they hold the next big thing for your business. Do they? We’ll see. As the week wears on, you can see our extended coverage from the show floor detailing product debuts, tech news, and our annual video countdown to the biggest game-changers for your business.

Here are a few categories that I’m keeping my eye on at this year’s show:

  • Smart home tech: These devices are getting more sophisticated, easier to use, and more affordable. Our favorite artificial intelligence tools—Amazon’s Alexa, Siri, and Google Home—are being folded in to ever more products. I’ll be scouting the show floor for more innovations in the smart-home arena. For the third consecutive year, Coldwell Banker will be sponsoring the Smart Home Marketplace, so we’ll also check in to hear what they see as the most important innovations for real estate pros.
  • Smart cities: Technology is expected to reshape our cities, combining artificial intelligence, data analytics, electric grids, public safety, and intelligent transportation. Global spending on smart city initiatives is projected to reach more than $34 billion by 2020. I’ll be looking to understand how municipalities are planning to connect communities in new ways with more sensors that can do everything from monitoring air quality to alerting police when the sound of gunshots are detected.
  • 5G: This super-fast wireless speed, which is supposed to be 100 times faster and five times more responsive than what we currently use, is coming to a smart phone near you. AT&T and Verizon are expected to give status updates on the fifth-generation network technology during this year’s show. How will the ability to transfer and upload information instantly change your business?
  • Driverless cars: The technology may still be a ways off from your local lanes, but more autonomous driving features are gradually hitting the roadways. This will transform the way our economy and the built environment function, which is why it’s vital for real estate professionals to understand.
  • Robots: Virtual tours via robots? They’re already happening. While real estate professionals aren’t in danger of being replaced by robots, some are excited by the idea of showings becoming easier. I’ll be looking for new ways robots could become your next office assistant.
  • Drones: It wouldn’t be a proper CES show without drones buzzing in the air. What are the latest advances in capturing property photos from the sky? The technology is getting easier to use, and a bodyguard-like drone has me intrigued.
  • Virtual reality: VR headsets allow you to take buyers inside of a listing from anywhere in the world. Real estate pros have already been experimenting with the technology, but I’m looking forward to checking in on the latest developments from CES.

There’s plenty more. Smart appliances, cameras, and of course, there are always those unexpected exhibitors who manage to make you raise your eyebrow as you walk by—was that a laundry folding robot? I’ll definitely be stopping by to get his card!

Thank you for visiting my site Highlandscountyhomes.com. If this is your first visit, take your time and look around at some of the great affordable and attractive homes. Highlands County has some of the most spectacular lakefront homes for sale. Highlands County Homes allows you to search directly from the MLS, the same syatem that realtors use where you get a true real time list of active properties. When you search on Trulia and Zillow and others, they are not linked to the MLS so many times you are wasting time looking at home that are no longer on the market. Through this site you can customize your search and find exactly what you want at the price you want and know it is active.

Waterfront Homes and Canal Homes can be found on over 25 lakes in Highlands County. Highlands County is called Highlands because it is the highest point above sea level in Florida. Lake Placid is like a paradise of rolling hills, curvy roads and spectacular lakes with sweaping water views. Sebring is located directly in the middle of Highlands County with Lake Placid to the South and Avon Park to the North.

I have plenty of information and resources available to you. If you are a return visitor, thank you. I would love to hear from you and tell you how I can serve all your real estate needs.

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Thank you for visiting my site Highlandscountyhomes.com. If this is your first visit, take your time and look around at some of the great affordable and attractive homes. Highlands County has some of the most spectacular lakefront homes for sale. Highlands County Homes allows you to search directly from the MLS, the same syatem that realtors use where you get a true real time list of active properties. When you search on Trulia and Zillow and others, they are not linked to the MLS so many times you are wasting time looking at home that are no longer on the market. Through this site you can customize your search and find exactly what you want at the price you want and know it is active.

Waterfront Homes and Canal Homes can be found on over 25 lakes in Highlands County. Highlands County is called Highlands because it is the highest point above sea level in Florida. Lake Placid is like a paradise of rolling hills, curvy roads and spectacular lakes with sweaping water views. Sebring is located directly in the middle of Highlands County with Lake Placid to the South and Avon Park to the North.

I have plenty of information and resources available to you. If you are a return visitor, thank you. I would love to hear from you and tell you how I can serve all your real estate needs.